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    Can I track my students' decisions in Banzai?

    Teachers using Banzai can track their students' progress in the simulation courses—Junior, Teen, and Plus—by seeing what decisions they made at every turn in the game. We call this the decision tree. By seeing your students' decisions in Banzai, you can talk to them about what helped them or hindered them from winning the game and achieving their financial goals.

    You can see the decision tree for each student by doing the following: 

    1. Log in  to your teacher account. 
    2. Select a class you created. (Note: If you haven't yet created a class,  read this article.)
    3. Select a student on the roster. 
    4. Navigate to the tab "The Game."

    You'll see your students' progress in a few ways, pictured below. 

    Not Started

    This state happens when a student hasn't started the game yet. 

    Under Way

    This state is what you will see most often. Students are making their way through the game and starting to make decisions. 

    The decision tree also shows what decisions a students decide not to take. So, for example, we show when a student chooses the bicycle in Banzai Junior, the decision tree also shows that they didn't choose the hover board.

    Multiple Attempts

    Many students will find Banzai challenging—that's kind of the whole point. The decision tree tracks all of your students' attempts, which you can view in the drop-down menu on the right side. You can also see the status of each of these attempts, whether a student restarted, completed, or is currently playing through the game. 

    Restarted

    If a student makes some choices but then restarts the game, the decision tree shows what decisions they did make. 

    Complete

    This is the big one! When a student has completed The Game, the decision tree shows the status in the drop-down menu and also a star by the tab "The Game." 

    The decision tree can help you understand how your students are learning financial literacy, and the more you understand their thought process, the easier it is to dive into classroom discussions they'll engage with.